Friday , 17 November 2017

Cyanotype

Cyanotypes – Gallery 2

This webpage may contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. As an underground resource for art education and creative inspiration, the Freestone Print Company is making these found images available in our efforts to advance the understanding of graphic design, photography, alternative photographic processes, street art as a outlet for public discourse, typography, and ... Read More »

Cyanotypes – Gallery 1

This webpage may contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. As an underground resource for art education and creative inspiration, the Freestone Print Company is making these found images available in our efforts to advance the understanding of graphic design, photography, alternative photographic processes, street art as a outlet for public discourse, typography, and ... Read More »

Toning Formulas for Cyanotype

Toning involves two basic steps: bleaching and toning. Every toner for this process contains some form of tannin, because cyanotype base formulas use iron instead of silver gelatin, like black-and-white photography. Tannin chemically binds to iron in the coated emulsion, changing the print’s color. Why Tone Your Prints? There will be times when you simply don’t want a blue image but still wish to use ... Read More »

The Cyanotype Process Step-by-Step

At a Glance: Unlike photographs set in silver, like in black and white photography, cyanotypes use a solution of iron compounds. This process invented by Sir John Herschel has changed little since his discovery was unveiled in 1842. The beauty of cyanotype is its versatility: There’s a limitless number of materials an artist can use to make a personalized cyanotype. ... Read More »

Base Formulas for Cyanotype

The chemicals needed for cyanotypes are inexpensive. They are relatively safe to handle and keep well both dry and in solution. Ferric ammonium citrate: Two powdered forms: 1.) brown-red and 2.) green. The green powder is more light sensitive and produces a longer tonal range. Potassium ferricyanide: Exercise care. There is a similar compound, potassium ferrocyanide, that will not work ... Read More »

Cyanotype-Safe Papers

Papers The best paper to use for the cyanotype process is quality hot or cold press paper, like Arches Platine, Fabriano Artistico, Lanaquarelle Watercolor, Arches Acquarelle, Saunder’s Waterford, Somerset Book, and Crane’s Platinotype. These papers are neutral pH (in the middle of being acidic or alkaline) and have good sizing. They are also made to withstand the rigors of extended immersion ... Read More »

The First Woman Photographer

Anna Atkins (1799–1871) was the first woman photographer. Referred to sparingly by traditional photo historians, she made beautiful cyanotype photograms of algae, ferns, feathers, and waterweeds. Her botanist father, John George Children, and Sir John Herschel were friends — the Atkins and Herschel families resided only 30 miles apart in Kent, England. Atkins’ father was also a member of the Royal Society. When Herschel announced ... Read More »

Prussian Blue: A History of Cyanotype

Cyanotype is one of the simplest and most archival photographic processes. This particular alternative photo process – or “alt photo” for short – produces a cyan blue print (hence, cyanotype) using two main chemicals: ferric ammonium citrate and potassium ferricyanide, each of which can be purchased for less than $10. Cyanotypes need only plain tap water for developing and can be printed on various papers, some fabrics, and even glass! Inventor of ... Read More »